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Title

Lubricin: A Principal Modulator of the Psychoneuroendocrine - Osteoimmune Interactome Implications for Novel Treatments of Osteoarthritic Pathologies

 

Authors

Allen Khakshooy1, 4 Nicole Balenton1, 3 Francesco Chiappelli1, 2, 3

 

Affiliation

1Laboratory of Human Psychoneuroendocrine-Osteoimmunology; School of Dentistry, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1668;

2Evidence-Based Decision Practice-Based Research Network, DGSO, Los Angeles, CA 91403;

3Department of the Health Sciences, CSUN, Northridge, CA 91330;

4Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel 3109601;

 

Email

fchiappelli@dentistry.ucla.edu

 

Article Type

Hypothesis

 

Date

Received October 5, 2017; Accepted October 5, 2017; Published October 31, 2017

 

Abstract

Lubricin is a synovial glycoprotein that contributes to joint lubrication. We propose the hypothesis that lubricin is a key modulator of the psychoneuroendocrine-osteoimmune interactome, with important clinical relevance for osteoarthritic pathologies. We consider a variety of neuroendocrine-immune factors, including inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the modulation of lubricin in rheumatic complications. Based on our preliminary immunocytochemistry and fractal analysis data, and in the context of translational research of modern healthcare, we propose that molecular lubricin gene expression modification by means of the novel CRISPR/Cas system be considered for osteoarthritic therapies.

 

Keywords

Lubricin, interactome, osteoimmunology, psychoneuroendocrine-osteoimmunology, osteoarthritis, CRISPR

 

Citation

Khakshooy et al. Bioinformation 13(10): 343-346 (2017)

 

Edited by

P Kangueane

 

ISSN

0973-2063

 

Publisher

Biomedical Informatics

 

License

This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. This is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.