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Title

Impact of rotavirus and hepatitis A virus by worldwide climatic changes during the period between 2000 and 2013

 

Authors

Fatima Tarek1*, N. Hassou1, M.N. Benchekroun2, S. Boughribil3, J.Hafid4, H. Bessi4, M.M. Ennaji1

 

Affiliation

1Team of Virology and Oncology, Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/Ecotoxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques Mohammedia, University Hassan II of Casablanca; 2Team of Biotechnology an Environment Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/ Eco toxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and techniques Mohammedia, University Hassan II of Casablanca; 3Team of Eco toxicology and Biodiversity, Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/ Ecotoxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and techniques Mohammedia, University Hassan II of Casablanca;
4Team of Immuno parasitology, Laboratory food, Environment and Health FST Gueliz, University Cadi Ayyad Marrakech.

 

Email

Fatima Tarek - E-mail: fatimatarek97@gmail.com; Phone: +212675160320; *Corresponding author

 

Article Type

Research Article

 

Date

Received October 16, 2018; Revised November 10, 2018; Accepted November 12, 2018; Published March 15, 2019

 

Abstract

Enteric viruses are present in the environment as a result of the discharge of poorly or untreated wastewater. The spread of enteric viruses in the environment depend to human activities like stools of infected individuals ejected in the external environment can be transmitted by water sources and back to susceptible individuals for other cycles of illness. Among the enteric viruses Rotaviruses (RV) and Hepatitis A viruses (HAV) is the most detected in wastewater causing gastroenteritis and acute hepatitis. Therefore, it is of interest to climate change, mainly temperature and carbon Dioxide (CO2) variations, on Rotavirus and Hepatitis A as a model of enteric viruses present in the aquatic environment using computational modelling tools. The results of genetic ratio showed a negative correlation between the epidemiological data and the mutation rate. However, the correlation was positive between the temperature, CO2 increase, and the rate of mutation. The positive correlation is explained by the adaptation of the viruses to the climatic changes, the RNA polymerase of the RV induces errors to adapt to the environmental conditions. The simultaneous increase in number of infections and temperature in 2010 has been demonstrated in previous studies deducing that viral pathogenicity increase with temperature increase.

 

Keywords

Carbon dioxide, hepatitis A virus, mutation rate, rotavirus, temperature variations.

 

Citation

Tarek et al. Bioinformation 15(3): 194-200 (2019)

 

Edited by

P Kangueane

 

ISSN

0973-2063

 

Publisher

Biomedical Informatics

 

License

This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. This is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.