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Title

A study on risk factors for Parkinsonís disease in Indian population

 

Authors

Vineeta Gupta1, Ravindra Kumar Garg2, Kamlesh Kumar Pant1 & Sanjay Khattri1*

 

Affiliation

1Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, King Georgeís Medical University, Lucknow-226003, Uttar Pradesh, India; 2Department of Neurology, King Georgeís Medical University, Lucknow-226003, Uttar Pradesh, India

 

Email

pharmacsmmu01@gmail.com; *Corresponding authors

 

Article Type

Hypothesis

 

Date

Received June 07, 2014; Accepted June 07, 2014; Published June 30, 2014

 

Abstract

Parkinsonís disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The exact cause of selective dopaminergic neurodegeneration is unknown, but it is supposed that etiology of Parkinsonís disease is multifactorial and consists of an interaction between environmental factors and genetic predisposition. To find out the association between environmental factors and risk of Parkinsonís disease, a case control study was designed including 97 Parkinsonís disease patients and 97 controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors for Parkinsonís disease. Results from the present study showed that gender, religion, education, place of living, occupation, dietary habits, tobacco chewing, smoking, alcohol intake, and head injury had no association with PD. However, chemical exposure and well water drinking were significantly associated with PD, which concluded that environmental factors could act as a risk factor for PD in some way.

 

Keywords

Parkinsonís disease, risk factors, chemical exposure, well water.

 

Citation

Gupta et al. Bioinformation 10(6): 342-346 (2014)
 

Edited by

P Kangueane

 

ISSN

0973-2063

 

Publisher

Biomedical Informatics

 

License

This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. This is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.